David Lynch Exhibition: New Painting and Sculpture

David Lynch William Griffin Gallery Exhibition

Last week, I had the chance to visit the William Griffin Gallery in Santa Monica, Los Angeles, and check out David Lynch’s second exhibition in this space: New Painting and Sculpture.

Using cold-rolled steel, plaster, gauze, tint, resin and other materials and objects like matches and cardboard, the movie director creates unique, story-telling paintings and lamps. Some would call these stories scary or bizarre, I found them amusing. Take “Pete Goes To His Girlfriend’s House”, where the seemingly romantic title of the mixed media painting gets contradicted with images of a terrified, doll-sized woman and a monstrous man carrying a gun AND a knife. I love dark humor.

David Lynch: Pete Goes To This Girlfriend's House
Pete Goes To This Girlfriend's House

Fire is present in many of Lynch’s works, including his paintings. Note the use of little light bulbs to visualize fire sparks.

David Lynch - Boy Lights Fire
Boy Lights Fire

And here’s the “new sculpture” as referred to in the exhibit’s title. Think of Lynch’s table and floor lamp sculptures as Tim Burton meets industrial.

David Lynch - Red Black Yellow Table Lamp
Red Black Yellow Table Lamp

There are a bunch of pictures from the exhibit’s opening night, attended by Lynch ladies Laura Dern, Laura Harring and Grace Zabriskie, available at isopix.be

David Lynch and his sculptures
David Lynch in front of a sculpture on the opening night

By the way, mad props to Maggie Kayne for sporting a Black Lodge outfit to the reception.

Maggie Kayne as the Black Lodge
Maggie Kayne is wearing the Black Lodge

From the press release:

While many film directors have made forays into the other visual arts—usually as filmmaking aids—Lynch’s paintings, sculptures, and photography are integral to his vision and comprise a body of work in their own right. Yet ultimately Lynch is unique in creating works that touch a nerve in the narrative of the American psyche no matter the medium. In this he is a poet and not merely a fantasist.

Through May 28, 2011 (Tuesday-Saturday from 10 AM to 6 PM) at the William Griffin Gallery, 2902 Nebraska Avenue Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310.586.6886).

Pieter Dom

Written by Pieter Dom

Founder and curator of Welcome to Twin Peaks since 2011. Bobsessed since March 1991.

Comments

Share your thoughts
  1. Am I getting this right?

    In, “Boy Lights Fire,” the artist is depicting “boy” as the bad thief in this golgothian tryptic to the *illiterate* (secular society; actors playing in “Left Side Story” of *The Bell Hill*). However, to the literate, the educated folk, the priestly class, *boy* appears as the *Good Thief*.

    The work is making the point that the same information can manifest opposing meanings in the minds of the so edified from one end of the intelligence spectrum to the other. It is (I believe) the statement that he has found this thread running through his previous observation that the nature of life seems chaotic, as information dispatchers do not pay attention to the manipuable qualities of this phenomena.

    Glossarism–the art of saying giving disparate messages to *insiders* versus *the unintitated*.

    At any rate I absolutely loved, “Wild at Heart,” and thus pretty much trust this person’s intent.

    Thank you very much, David Lynch and the people who’ve let me comment here. Thank you again.

    Best regards,

    Captian Phily

  2. Am I getting this right? (finished version)

    In, “Boy Lights Fire,” the artist is depicting “boy” as the bad thief in this golgothian tryptic to the *illiterate* (secular society; actors playing in “Left Side Story” of *The Bell Hill*). However, to the literate, the educated folk, the priestly class, *boy* appears as the *Good Thief*.

    The work is making the point that the same information can manifest opposing meanings in the minds of the so edified from one end of the intelligence spectrum to the other. It is (I believe) the statement that he has found this thread running through his previous observation that the nature of life seems chaotic, as information dispatchers do not pay attention to the manipuable qualities of this phenomena.

    I think too that the artist here is saying, most vividly (as usual for him), that he feels that the phenomenon of *Glossarism*-–the art of giving disparate messages to differinbg groups of individuals–is a phenomenon that should be paid much mind, as its potential as a manipulatory tool has the potential to interject a nearly ultimate amount of confusion into the milieu.

    At any rate I absolutely loved, “Wild at Heart,” and thus pretty much trust this person’s intent.

    Thank you very much, David Lynch and the people who’ve let me comment here. Thank you again.

    Best regards,

    Captian Phily

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Optionally add an image (JPEG only)

Loading…

0

Comments

0 comments