How good is part 8?  

Page 2 / 4
  RSS
(@oyster_bells)
Roadhouse Regular
Posted by: Chris Sampson

I've been mulling over Part 8 for the last 2 weeks and have something I want to get off my chest. 

I thought it was great when I first watched it - ambitious, innovative and unexpected.  Then everyone started saying this was world class cinema: 2001 and then some, Kubrik++, groundbreaking television. Some even said that this was Great Art - Rodin, get back in your box, Picasso, take a back seat.

And I started to have some doubts. 

Why does Lynch rely so much on metaphysical/supernatural characters (the "Fireman", the "woodsman", doppelgangers) in TP: the Return.  These characters, to quote Morrissey, say "nothing to me about my life".  I'm 50 years old now, I don't get scare by Bogeymen. This was not the way in Blue Velvet.  Why are so many characters arbitrarily killed off? We don't have time to care about the Radio receptionist and DJ; their deaths are meaningless.  Is this the point?  That modern life is remote, expendable, cold and unemotional?  This needs to be explored before I'll call Episode 8 Great Art.  Don't get me wrong - I liked the nuclear test sequence, and the black and white filming works for me - but I feel emotionally disengaged from what is happening to the people on screen.  It wasn't this way with Audrey and Coop in the first series.

I absolutely agree that so far there hasn't been much emotional content in seas3.  But that's because it's been focusing on mystery.  We're being led from clue to clue and being made more and more curious.  Lynch even said in one of the interviews, asked to sum up the new season, he said something like he's taking the viewers to rediscover mystery.

Good film/TV doesn't have to contain everything.  A work to be considered good doesn't have to have mystery, action, romance, humor, good soundtrack, and a moral.  A good work just needs to pick the area(s) it wants to play in and does well with that.

That said, I think there are still many episodes to go for things to turn emotional.  That should be very easily achieved using the old Twin Peaks characters, because they're pre-established, because of how nostalgic we feel about them.  We got a hint of sadness with James being mocked at the bar and Shelly defending saying James is cool.  But James hasn't shown up again and we never see his thing with Shelly's friend develop.  That seems like intentional : it is there, Lynch can simply follow up if he wants, but maybe not yet.

I am betting that's why Audrey's been safely locked away still, halfway into the season.  Her reappearance will be big.

"Dougie, who do you prefer now, me or that Jade?"
"Jade."
"No, no, Dougie! Jade. Or. Me?"
"Me."
"Okay, once again. Jade. Or. Janey-E?"
"E."

ReplyQuote
Posted : 07/07/2017 5:00 pm
(@oyster_bells)
Roadhouse Regular
Posted by: SamXTherapy
Posted by: Roberto Bella

I found episode 8 to be deeply troubling, like a nightmare of extreme dark forces entering the world. As Lynch is among other things a master of suspense / horror, I would say 'mission accomplished.' Which is different than saying that I "liked" it. But I also could not look away. We are implicated in our gazing somewhat too.

It did remind me of Kubrick's "2001" - the attempt to leap from "ordinary life" to completely supernatural underpinnings.

You are certainly entitled not to believe me, but my family has all had experiences with what we perceive as spirits. I have long thought of Lynch's work as subconsciously allegorical. He often suggests the dabbling by supernatural forces of extreme light and extreme darkness, maneuvering behind the scenes, with humans sometimes employed like chess pieces.

Think of "Lost Highway." <SPOILERS>

Robert Blake's dark character appears supernatural. He is "invited in" by the jealousy of the sax player, leading to murder most foul. The sax player has a personality schism to try to protect himself from the truth of his own actions. But is ultimately drawn back into the horrible reality.

I've had experiences that  people would probably say were supernatural but, being the pragmatic sort that I am, I put it down in the great big category called "Stuff We Have No Idea About".

I firmly believe that everything - absolutely everything - in this universe forms part of an ultimately explainable, understandable whole.  That's not to say it would ever be within our capacity to explain or understand, but that some being, somewhere would be able to get it.

Spirits and ghosts, though... nope.  Not the remnants of dead people, not that.  That's absolutely one thing I do not believe in, since I do not believe in the existence of a soul.  I can believe in some natural phenomenon that creates a being or simulation that is ghost like, or even some strange form of alien entity that has all the characteristics of a ghost.

Baryonic matter and the energy associated with it makes up only a tiny fraction of the universe.  Most of it is empty space; even down at subatomic level there's more nothing than something.  The rest of it is this strange stuff, Dark Matter and Dark Energy.  Who knows what's going on there, since it appears they don't interact with our version of stuff in any way.

Postscript to all that:

I am a damn good Tarot reader.  Always have been.  Not the faintest idea why, or what on earth attracted me to them in the first place but there you go.

You don't believe in the existence of soul.

How about the collective unconscious, Sam?  The unified place Jung said we go to when we dream, also the place we go down to during Transcendental Meditation?

"Dougie, who do you prefer now, me or that Jade?"
"Jade."
"No, no, Dougie! Jade. Or. Me?"
"Me."
"Okay, once again. Jade. Or. Janey-E?"
"E."

ReplyQuote
Posted : 07/07/2017 5:40 pm
(@samxtherapy)
Detective

How about it?  I believe in racial memory, sure, but there are many interpretations as to the how and why of it.  I don't believe Jung was right; he believed in, or at least, promoted some demonstrably, laughably silly ideas, nor do I believe the interpretations of the results of TM.  It's been demonstrated several times that we are somehow - most likely at a cellular and genetic level - wired for collective action and belief.  It's also been demonstrated that our cerebral cortex and everything that goes with it, often over complicates things and in so doing, gets stuff hopelessly wrong.

If we have one collective delusion, it's that somehow we are special.  Special people - as a species, that is - on a special planet.  Evidence suggests otherwise; we're a lucky offshoot of a set of creatures that became gorillas, chimpanzees and other apes.  In terms of biological similarity, we could even be a sub-species of chimpanzee.  Our overall DNA is very, very close to chimpanzee DNA, and our blood DNA, which is the usual measure of how close one species is to another, is identical.

If we have souls, so must they.  Where does that stop?  Cats?  Dogs?  Birds?  Even the whole idea of consciousness is harder to define in meaningful terms than nailing a jelly to the ceiling.  Where does stimulus/response end and real thought begin?  I could give you a very convincing argument that we are only a very complicated set of stimulus/response reactions and triggers.  A big biological box of switches, if you like.

Dreams, once believed to be some sort of magical and/or mystical portal are now widely regarded in scientific communities as either the brain's equivalent of defragging and indexing, or your own consciousness doing some background work on stuff that's somehow important, or a combination of both.

Coppula eam se non posit acceptera jocularum

ReplyQuote
Posted : 07/07/2017 7:15 pm
(@droseth1)
Dweller
Posted by: Roberto Bella
Posted by: Dennis Roseth

David Lynch has been practicing Trancendental Meditation (TM) for many years. As a practicer myself, I can assuredly say that it opens up the human mind in ways not fully understood. One of the ways is by experiencing the subjective. These are areas inside your mind or outside of your body near the Unified Field where things just get crazy and can't be objectively quantified. So yes I loved part eight because what he's doing makes sense to me. The lodges are in the subjective aether so anytime he's telling their story his art direction goes this way. When we are back in the objective world, the subjective seeps through as well. As far as spirits/entities go, quantum physics, and correct me if I'm wrong, postulates at least 9 other dimensions that we cannot experience. It is scientifically plausible that a nuclear explosion could open up those dimensions and that we are experiencing what looks like ghosts simply because in our dimension they may have to exist differently to get through.

Yes, I knew Lynch was deep into TM and assumed he got a lot of his concepts from it. I've meditated before, but not specifically in this way.

Since all matter is vibrational, many people who believe in spirit also believe there are overlapping planes of existence which we can't fully perceive as humans. Our reality is one plane, and perhaps what one might think of as "heaven" is at a higher vibration, and overlaid on this one. Mediums are people who can raise their vibrations to communicate with "spirits" who lower their vibrations to meet them in between.

And as fascinating as I find it all to be, I would also like to caution those who have no experience with this stuff to be very cautious. The abyss stares back. Far better to keep your eyes and focus on the light, as it were.

Another concept of reality that is entirely possible is that we do in fact live in a simulated reality. It's been theorized that once a civilization has the technological capability to create virtual realities, they surely will. What makes us think we're the 'original reality?' We could just be running on "god the supercomputer."

Yes. Buyer beware. TM Meditation teachers will tell you all about the bliss but not about the evil it will uncork in your brain. It can be a terrifying experience for some. Thankfully, once that stuff is purged it does seem to get more blissful over time.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 07/07/2017 7:17 pm
(@droseth1)
Dweller
Posted by: SamXTherapy

The simulation problem has been tackled - successfully, in my opinion - by Iain M Banks.  The basic objection is something known as the "Morality Principle", or something along those lines.  If, for example, you could create a realistic simulation to the extent that the entities inhabiting it were self aware, why the dickens would you also create stuff such as suffering, injustice, disease?  Sure, you can't - or probably can't - code away every single unfortunate happening; there are always accidents and the law of averages will always win eventually, but...

Unless you are a malevolent creature who delights in seeing your creations suffer and die, through no fault of their own, you'd go out of your way to make things as safe and pleasant as possible.  Clearly, our own reality is very, very far from being a fair, just and safe place so it's safe to assume the reality we inhabit is as real as it gets.  The alternative - we are in a simulation created by a maniac - is too horrible to contemplate.

In either event, the outcome is the same, since we are unable to change the rules, recode the program or reboot the system.

Ok this was really cool to read. It reminded me of some thoughts I had once. Terrifying thought: Humanity isn't working as intended. Even more terrifying thought: Humanity is working exactly as intended.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 07/07/2017 7:19 pm
(@droseth1)
Dweller
Posted by: SamXTherapy

How about it?  I believe in racial memory, sure, but there are many interpretations as to the how and why of it.  I don't believe Jung was right; he believed in, or at least, promoted some demonstrably, laughably silly ideas, nor do I believe the interpretations of the results of TM.  It's been demonstrated several times that we are somehow - most likely at a cellular and genetic level - wired for collective action and belief.  It's also been demonstrated that our cerebral cortex and everything that goes with it, often over complicates things and in so doing, gets stuff hopelessly wrong.

If we have one collective delusion, it's that somehow we are special.  Special people - as a species, that is - on a special planet.  Evidence suggests otherwise; we're a lucky offshoot of a set of creatures that became gorillas, chimpanzees and other apes.  In terms of biological similarity, we could even be a sub-species of chimpanzee.  Our overall DNA is very, very close to chimpanzee DNA, and our blood DNA, which is the usual measure of how close one species is to another, is identical.

If we have souls, so must they.  Where does that stop?  Cats?  Dogs?  Birds?  Even the whole idea of consciousness is harder to define in meaningful terms than nailing a jelly to the ceiling.  Where does stimulus/response end and real thought begin?  I could give you a very convincing argument that we are only a very complicated set of stimulus/response reactions and triggers.  A big biological box of switches, if you like.

Dreams, once believed to be some sort of magical and/or mystical portal are now widely regarded in scientific communities as either the brain's equivalent of defragging and indexing, or your own consciousness doing some background work on stuff that's somehow important, or a combination of both.

It will be difficult for anyone to understand the benefits of TM unless they practice. But scientifically speaking, TM and other forms of meditation are so widely recognized as having positive results that even the Mayo clinic endorses it. They just won't call it TM due to the possible offensive nature to other's religions/philosophies. Sure, there are way out there philosophies regarding TM such as the Maharishi Effect. But at its core, it's a deeply powerful practice and has been proven to reduce stress, help the body heal, increase intelligence, and many other things. Anecdotally, it has done all that and more for me and I stopped practicing years ago.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 07/07/2017 7:25 pm
(@samxtherapy)
Detective

I don't deny it works, merely that the ideas as to the why of it are questionable.  Stuff like Exegesis works, so do positive and negative reinforcement (you could argue that's all Exegesis is, at the core), concentration, practice and study all work.  

Example, a good old fashioned light bulb.  You and I know how it works, we understand about current flow, resistance, all that malarkey.  Now, imagine that same bulb being shown to someone from the 1500s.  They'd probably think there were demons trapped inside, or angel's breath, or unicorn tears or whatever.

Way back in this thread, I said there's a big box labelled "Stuff We Know Nothing About".  TM and similar belong in that box with a sticker saying, "Just because it sounds weird - and is therefore naturally appealing - doesn't mean it's the right interpretation.  Remember Occam's Razor".

And please, please don't anyone start mentioning things like "Positive and Negative Energy" in terms other than the strict scientific definition, or I really will have to get my gun. 😉

Apropos nothing, did you know the measurable speed of thought in a human brain is between 30 and 40 discrete thought events per second?  Not really all that fast.

Coppula eam se non posit acceptera jocularum

ReplyQuote
Posted : 07/07/2017 7:37 pm
(@droseth1)
Dweller
Posted by: SamXTherapy

I don't deny it works, merely that the ideas as to the why of it are questionable.  Stuff like Exegesis works, so do positive and negative reinforcement (you could argue that's all Exegesis is, at the core), concentration, practice and study all work.  

Example, a good old fashioned light bulb.  You and I know how it works, we understand about current flow, resistance, all that malarkey.  Now, imagine that same bulb being shown to someone from the 1500s.  They'd probably think there were demons trapped inside, or angel's breath, or unicorn tears or whatever.

Way back in this thread, I said there's a big box labelled "Stuff We Know Nothing About".  TM and similar belong in that box with a sticker saying, "Just because it sounds weird - and is therefore naturally appealing - doesn't mean it's the right interpretation.  Remember Occam's Razor".

And please, please don't anyone start mentioning things like "Positive and Negative Energy" in terms other than the strict scientific definition, or I really will have to get my gun. 😉

Apropos nothing, did you know the measurable speed of thought in a human brain is between 30 and 40 discrete thought events per second?  Not really all that fast.

Ya I get what you're saying. And the TM teachers have a highly subjective way of describing what is happening. Much of it has to do with quantum mechanics and the Unified Field of Consciousness. This was passed down through the ages. Since the early Vedic civilization and Himalayan Sages. The practice does seem to raise one's intuition substantially. Now here's a good question: Where does intuition come from?

ReplyQuote
Posted : 07/07/2017 7:43 pm
(@mark_chamberlain_stevens)
Roadhouse Regular
Posted by: SamXTherapy

I don't deny it works, merely that the ideas as to the why of it are questionable.  Stuff like Exegesis works, so do positive and negative reinforcement (you could argue that's all Exegesis is, at the core), concentration, practice and study all work.  

The buddhist variety meditation helps me clear the crap out of my monkey brain

Example, a good old fashioned light bulb.  You and I know how it works, we understand about current flow, resistance, all that malarkey.  Now, imagine that same bulb being shown to someone from the 1500s.  They'd probably think there were demons trapped inside, or angel's breath, or unicorn tears or whatever.

Yes, then they'd imprison you for "witchcraft" based upon "spectral evidence"....which happen to a family member in Salem in 1692....

Way back in this thread, I said there's a big box labelled "Stuff We Know Nothing About".  TM and similar belong in that box with a sticker saying, "Just because it sounds weird - and is therefore naturally appealing - doesn't mean it's the right interpretation.  Remember Occam's Razor".

And please, please don't anyone start mentioning things like "Positive and Negative Energy" in terms other than the strict scientific definition, or I really will have to get my gun. 😉

You should really see the nonsense that goes on out here in California...it's a cottage industry...

Apropos nothing, did you know the measurable speed of thought in a human brain is between 30 and 40 discrete thought events per second?  Not really all that fast.

I prefer the indiscrete ones...they're slower

ReplyQuote
Posted : 07/07/2017 7:51 pm
(@samxtherapy)
Detective

Intuition... My take on that one is as prosaic as it gets.  There's no such thing.  There you go, I said it; Intuition does not exist.

What does exist, though, is an awful lot of background processing and analysis of absolutely everything we are exposed to, to the limit of our senses.  We are pattern seeking creatures with a long history of the ability to survive in very unfavourable conditions.  Not so surprising then, that we can make great cognitive leaps that seem like we're pulling ideas out of nowhere.

All my life I've been a very good guesser; I can often predict, with a very high degree of accuracy, what, where, why and how.  I'm not talking about silly stuff like, a plane crashing so don't get on it, more along the lines of being able to spot an economic trend long before anyone else, or know when a particular action will bring about a seemingly unexpected result.  Not that it's ever done me any good, you understand.  I'm a pragmatist at heart, so a few pounds in my pocket can buy me food/clothes/guitar strings etc, rather than go and buy shares in MegaWowCorp, or whatever.

We all absorb a lot more information than we realize; we all soak up stuff each and every day.  Some of us can - from time to time - put it together in useful and/or meaningful ways.  That's yer basic intuition.

On the same lines, you may as well ask where inspiration and imagination come from.  Same place, you learn to get into the right mode of thinking to make the connections happen.  Standing in a room with a few other people, some guitars, drums and amps can be a magical thing when you start to pull these amazing sounds out of thin air.

Once, I used to spend a long, long time on lyrics.  Now, most of the time, I listen to the basic tune or a couple of riffs, then sing whatever I think is appropriate.  It seems my background/subconscious/unconscious or whatever it's called this week is a lot smarter than I am.  I may not be Poet Laureate but I'll take the Pepsi challenge with any other lyric writer in the world.  I don't think I have ever turned out a nonsense or laughably bad lyric yet.

Can say the same for painting and drawing, too.  Somewhat different in my case, because as a graphic designer, I had the "art" part of artistry knocked right out of me.  Now, my stuff, such as it is, is just a representation of a mechanical skill.  As a result, I paint and draw very little, and the stuff I do is usually for other people, or as a showcase for something or other.

So, intuition, inspiration, creativity in general; all part of the 30 to 40 bits per second grey sponge in the head.  Nowt mystical about that.

Coppula eam se non posit acceptera jocularum

ReplyQuote
Posted : 07/07/2017 8:29 pm
(@droseth1)
Dweller
Posted by: SamXTherapy

Intuition... My take on that one is as prosaic as it gets.  There's no such thing.  There you go, I said it; Intuition does not exist.

What does exist, though, is an awful lot of background processing and analysis of absolutely everything we are exposed to, to the limit of our senses.  We are pattern seeking creatures with a long history of the ability to survive in very unfavourable conditions.  Not so surprising then, that we can make great cognitive leaps that seem like we're pulling ideas out of nowhere.

All my life I've been a very good guesser; I can often predict, with a very high degree of accuracy, what, where, why and how.  I'm not talking about silly stuff like, a plane crashing so don't get on it, more along the lines of being able to spot an economic trend long before anyone else, or know when a particular action will bring about a seemingly unexpected result.  Not that it's ever done me any good, you understand.  I'm a pragmatist at heart, so a few pounds in my pocket can buy me food/clothes/guitar strings etc, rather than go and buy shares in MegaWowCorp, or whatever.

We all absorb a lot more information than we realize; we all soak up stuff each and every day.  Some of us can - from time to time - put it together in useful and/or meaningful ways.  That's yer basic intuition.

On the same lines, you may as well ask where inspiration and imagination come from.  Same place, you learn to get into the right mode of thinking to make the connections happen.  Standing in a room with a few other people, some guitars, drums and amps can be a magical thing when you start to pull these amazing sounds out of thin air.

Once, I used to spend a long, long time on lyrics.  Now, most of the time, I listen to the basic tune or a couple of riffs, then sing whatever I think is appropriate.  It seems my background/subconscious/unconscious or whatever it's called this week is a lot smarter than I am.  I may not be Poet Laureate but I'll take the Pepsi challenge with any other lyric writer in the world.  I don't think I have ever turned out a nonsense or laughably bad lyric yet.

Can say the same for painting and drawing, too.  Somewhat different in my case, because as a graphic designer, I had the "art" part of artistry knocked right out of me.  Now, my stuff, such as it is, is just a representation of a mechanical skill.  As a result, I paint and draw very little, and the stuff I do is usually for other people, or as a showcase for something or other.

So, intuition, inspiration, creativity in general; all part of the 30 to 40 bits per second grey sponge in the head.  Nowt mystical about that.

Interesting take. I guess I wasn't implying mysticism rather being closer to the Unified Field of Consciousness. Like dipping your toe in a pool of knowledge and when you bring it out it still has a drop or two of knowledge left on it. We could say, more objectively, that you're just going deeper into the brain itself. Maharishi is quoted as saying this helps use total brain instead of being locked in to left or right. And indeed, the EEG tests show that meditation lights up the brain as if you were in delta brainwave deep sleep. It is interesting. I've had some unique experiences meditating but none so unique as being awake in a realm that has literally nothingness. No thoughts, emotion, etc. Just an empty void. It doesn't need to be explained mystically though many try to. But it's still a place of raw subjective. It can't be measured or quantified by science at least not yet. But Maharishi at heart was a scientist. He saw the value of explaining everything both objectively and subjectively.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 07/07/2017 8:51 pm
(@lynn_watson)
Roadhouse Regular

A very interesting thread...  I really don't know that much about meditation - but am completely prepared to believe it does something, but probably not in the way that some folk claim.
I do get very prickly when presented with anything which is backed up with woo-ish explanations, probably 'cos I've had fibromyalgia for 20 years - and believe me, I've had every wacko 'cure' pushed at me over that time...

There have been some very interesting drug-induced side effects ( all sorts of meds might help with chronic pain, but some do send you a bit loopy!)  I did get referred for bio-feedback & was very skeptical.  You get wired up to a thing like a lie detector - and watch your brain waves.  You then learn to control them.  And I could do it - and switch from one type to another really quickly.  At our local science centre they had a game called mindball - where you actually control the movement of this ball by relaxing.  Or if you know what you're doing you can make it roll backwards & forwards...  🙂

I can't describe what I do to change these brainwaves - but I suspect that things like that may very well factor in to people who have 'good intuition' or notice 'prescences'.   If you take in a lot of information, no matter how disjointed it seems to be - and don't automatically try to make 'sense' of it, it seems to just chunter away there as part of background processing.  I suspect when your brain is in 'relaxed' mode, it is probably finding some connections.  

This may give you the feeling of being unsettled that something is wrong as you have the information available, but can't recall it as a 'fact'. So your insinct may very well be backed by reason, but you can't actually pinpoint that reason.  This could also affect vision, as when you're relaxed & not particularly focusing on anything, you're liable to be using the rods in your retina proportionally more - and that's when you see moving objects (which tend not to be sharp & are monochrome 'cos that's what the rods pass on)

So there may be prosaic explanations for some of these things, but if there are such things as ghosts, I'll be doing my absolute damnedest to let everyone know!  🙂
 

 

ReplyQuote
Posted : 07/07/2017 10:13 pm
(@droseth1)
Dweller
Posted by: Lynn Watson

A very interesting thread...  I really don't know that much about meditation - but am completely prepared to believe it does something, but probably not in the way that some folk claim.
I do get very prickly when presented with anything which is backed up with woo-ish explanations, probably 'cos I've had fibromyalgia for 20 years - and believe me, I've had every wacko 'cure' pushed at me over that time...

There have been some very interesting drug-induced side effects ( all sorts of meds might help with chronic pain, but some do send you a bit loopy!)  I did get referred for bio-feedback & was very skeptical.  You get wired up to a thing like a lie detector - and watch your brain waves.  You then learn to control them.  And I could do it - and switch from one type to another really quickly.  At our local science centre they had a game called mindball - where you actually control the movement of this ball by relaxing.  Or if you know what you're doing you can make it roll backwards & forwards...  🙂

I can't describe what I do to change these brainwaves - but I suspect that things like that may very well factor in to people who have 'good intuition' or notice 'prescences'.   If you take in a lot of information, no matter how disjointed it seems to be - and don't automatically try to make 'sense' of it, it seems to just chunter away there as part of background processing.  I suspect when your brain is in 'relaxed' mode, it is probably finding some connections.  

This may give you the feeling of being unsettled that something is wrong as you have the information available, but can't recall it as a 'fact'. So your insinct may very well be backed by reason, but you can't actually pinpoint that reason.  This could also affect vision, as when you're relaxed & not particularly focusing on anything, you're liable to be using the rods in your retina proportionally more - and that's when you see moving objects (which tend not to be sharp & are monochrome 'cos that's what the rods pass on)

So there may be prosaic explanations for some of these things, but if there are such things as ghosts, I'll be doing my absolute damnedest to let everyone know!  🙂
 

 

Hey there fellow fibro survivor! I've had it for ten years and I'm really sorry you have it. It's tough. The TM didn't help with the pain or fatigue initially, but over time it's had a fairly positive impact. You've had it 20 years so you were part of the time period that people and doctors thought you were crazy. Yet here we are today and it's recognized by the medical community as a serious illness. I've been able to recover about 75% but man I take some radical approaches. I hope you never stop seeking, friend. 

ReplyQuote
Posted : 07/07/2017 10:43 pm
(@oyster_bells)
Roadhouse Regular
Posted by: SamXTherapy

Intuition... My take on that one is as prosaic as it gets.  There's no such thing.  There you go, I said it; Intuition does not exist.

What does exist, though, is an awful lot of background processing and analysis of absolutely everything we are exposed to, to the limit of our senses.  We are pattern seeking creatures with a long history of the ability to survive in very unfavourable conditions.  Not so surprising then, that we can make great cognitive leaps that seem like we're pulling ideas out of nowhere.

All my life I've been a very good guesser; I can often predict, with a very high degree of accuracy, what, where, why and how.  I'm not talking about silly stuff like, a plane crashing so don't get on it, more along the lines of being able to spot an economic trend long before anyone else, or know when a particular action will bring about a seemingly unexpected result.  Not that it's ever done me any good, you understand.  I'm a pragmatist at heart, so a few pounds in my pocket can buy me food/clothes/guitar strings etc, rather than go and buy shares in MegaWowCorp, or whatever.

We all absorb a lot more information than we realize; we all soak up stuff each and every day.  Some of us can - from time to time - put it together in useful and/or meaningful ways.  That's yer basic intuition.

On the same lines, you may as well ask where inspiration and imagination come from.  Same place, you learn to get into the right mode of thinking to make the connections happen.  Standing in a room with a few other people, some guitars, drums and amps can be a magical thing when you start to pull these amazing sounds out of thin air.

Once, I used to spend a long, long time on lyrics.  Now, most of the time, I listen to the basic tune or a couple of riffs, then sing whatever I think is appropriate.  It seems my background/subconscious/unconscious or whatever it's called this week is a lot smarter than I am.  I may not be Poet Laureate but I'll take the Pepsi challenge with any other lyric writer in the world.  I don't think I have ever turned out a nonsense or laughably bad lyric yet.

Can say the same for painting and drawing, too.  Somewhat different in my case, because as a graphic designer, I had the "art" part of artistry knocked right out of me.  Now, my stuff, such as it is, is just a representation of a mechanical skill.  As a result, I paint and draw very little, and the stuff I do is usually for other people, or as a showcase for something or other.

So, intuition, inspiration, creativity in general; all part of the 30 to 40 bits per second grey sponge in the head.  Nowt mystical about that.

I agree to an extent, what people call intuition is sometimes reading subtle datas and patterns.  Though not when you receive no data whatsoever, like when you sense someone related to you is in an accident.

Also, that's not the case with your tarot results working, is it?  Even if you pick up subtle datas, you can't make the cards that come out match that.

And you're a peculiar one.  ?  How did it start, for someone who doesn't believe in human soul, to be reading tarot cards?  It's like you're attracted to spiritualism, but refuse to believe in it.

"Dougie, who do you prefer now, me or that Jade?"
"Jade."
"No, no, Dougie! Jade. Or. Me?"
"Me."
"Okay, once again. Jade. Or. Janey-E?"
"E."

ReplyQuote
Posted : 07/07/2017 10:48 pm
(@lynn_watson)
Roadhouse Regular

Thanks Dennis!  When I was diagnosed, the attitude was very much 'exercise is the way forward' - unfortunately I have a tendency to take things to extremes & made it worse.  It also turned out that my 'great range of movement' was joint hypermobility...

I think there are a lot of things that we don't understand & can be very helpful - accupuncture turned me into a giggling idiot!  I've been very lucky not to have had depression - and recently, after learning a bit about Mindfulness, wonder if it's something to do with the fact I seem to do that as a default setting...?

ReplyQuote
Posted : 07/07/2017 10:56 pm
Page 2 / 4
Share: