How good is part 8?  

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(@oyster_bells)
Roadhouse Regular
Posted by: Lynn Watson

At our local science centre they had a game called mindball - where you actually control the movement of this ball by relaxing.  Or if you know what you're doing you can make it roll backwards & forwards...  🙂

Lynn, tell me more about the balls, please!  ?

How accurate does the best person get it?  Like 80%?  Or 100%?  And it's at a science center???  How do they explain that in science??

"Dougie, who do you prefer now, me or that Jade?"
"Jade."
"No, no, Dougie! Jade. Or. Me?"
"Me."
"Okay, once again. Jade. Or. Janey-E?"
"E."

ReplyQuote
Posted : 08/07/2017 12:07 am
(@oyster_bells)
Roadhouse Regular
Posted by: Lynn Watson

I've been very lucky not to have had depression - and recently, after learning a bit about Mindfulness, wonder if it's something to do with the fact I seem to do that as a default setting...?

And which Mindfulness do you mean?  In general being considerate of how others might feel, putting ourselves in people's shoes, doing nothing in excess sorta thing?  Or is it some specific spiritual teaching?

Hmm.  Just from this very limited forum interaction, I can tell you're a very calm and positive person.  And maybe that's why.  ?

How do you deal with jerks who try to give you a hard time though?  Or do they just not do that when with you?

"Dougie, who do you prefer now, me or that Jade?"
"Jade."
"No, no, Dougie! Jade. Or. Me?"
"Me."
"Okay, once again. Jade. Or. Janey-E?"
"E."

ReplyQuote
Posted : 08/07/2017 12:20 am
(@oyster_bells)
Roadhouse Regular
Posted by: Dennis Roseth
Posted by: Roberto Bella
Posted by: Dennis Roseth

David Lynch has been practicing Trancendental Meditation (TM) for many years. As a practicer myself, I can assuredly say that it opens up the human mind in ways not fully understood. One of the ways is by experiencing the subjective. These are areas inside your mind or outside of your body near the Unified Field where things just get crazy and can't be objectively quantified. So yes I loved part eight because what he's doing makes sense to me. The lodges are in the subjective aether so anytime he's telling their story his art direction goes this way. When we are back in the objective world, the subjective seeps through as well. As far as spirits/entities go, quantum physics, and correct me if I'm wrong, postulates at least 9 other dimensions that we cannot experience. It is scientifically plausible that a nuclear explosion could open up those dimensions and that we are experiencing what looks like ghosts simply because in our dimension they may have to exist differently to get through.

Yes, I knew Lynch was deep into TM and assumed he got a lot of his concepts from it. I've meditated before, but not specifically in this way.

Since all matter is vibrational, many people who believe in spirit also believe there are overlapping planes of existence which we can't fully perceive as humans. Our reality is one plane, and perhaps what one might think of as "heaven" is at a higher vibration, and overlaid on this one. Mediums are people who can raise their vibrations to communicate with "spirits" who lower their vibrations to meet them in between.

And as fascinating as I find it all to be, I would also like to caution those who have no experience with this stuff to be very cautious. The abyss stares back. Far better to keep your eyes and focus on the light, as it were.

Another concept of reality that is entirely possible is that we do in fact live in a simulated reality. It's been theorized that once a civilization has the technological capability to create virtual realities, they surely will. What makes us think we're the 'original reality?' We could just be running on "god the supercomputer."

Yes. Buyer beware. TM Meditation teachers will tell you all about the bliss but not about the evil it will uncork in your brain. It can be a terrifying experience for some. Thankfully, once that stuff is purged it does seem to get more blissful over time.

Would you mind sharing some specifics about the terrifying experiences, Dennis?  And also Roberto?

I have contacted a TM instructor a while ago, but canceled our first meeting after seeing some people speaking up online.

The past 4 years or so, I have tried several types of meditation, but I happen to be somewhat slow to these things, it seems.  A few occasions I left halfway after learning that the organizations propagate things I'm against (prosperity teaching, sketchy worship of its founders).

 Also, I learned when I relax and breathe on a beach in shallow water, something strange happens.  A few gurus' responses were so apathetic when I asked them about this, that I became super weary when choosing a new teacher.

I'm also somewhat resistant to hypnosis.  One of my experiences in this was an Indian guy once came up to me out of the blue and started telling me true things about my past.  He had a mark on his forehead, wore traditional garments, and was middle-aged.  After that he wrote the name of a flower on a piece of paper, kept it in his fist, then told me to name a flower.  He was visibly stunned that it didn't work.  I named 3 flowers and none of them matched what he wrote on the piece of paper.  He was trying to put the name of the flower in my head.

"Dougie, who do you prefer now, me or that Jade?"
"Jade."
"No, no, Dougie! Jade. Or. Me?"
"Me."
"Okay, once again. Jade. Or. Janey-E?"
"E."

ReplyQuote
Posted : 08/07/2017 1:22 am
(@nautilus)
Owl

Apologies if this has already been answered but I have a problem with part 8.   So, when Bad Cooper and Ray escape from the prison they have an exchange about the information the latter has gleaned from Hastings's secretary, Betty. Ray says he has memorised the numbers and letters but he then attempts to extort money from Bad Cooper for the info. So far so good. Now flash forward a minute or two. Ray's left the car for a leak. Bad Cooper takes out the gun from the glove compartment and points it at Ray saying he wants the information. Ray turns around pointing his own gun at Bad Cooper (presumably supplied by the Prison Governor) and says something like "I tricked ya". So what does Bad Cooper do next? He tries to shoot Ray but the gun has been rigged and only fires blanks. My question is why would Bad Cooper even risk killing Ray who he has just sprung from jail and holds the vital information he is seeking in his head? This simply does not add up to me but I would dearly welcome views from others.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 08/07/2017 4:13 am
(@thegreatnortherner)
Lodger

 

I'm also somewhat resistant to hypnosis.  One of my experiences in this was an Indian guy once came up to me out of the blue and started telling me true things about my past.  He had a mark on his forehead, wore traditional garments, and was middle-aged.  After that he wrote the name of a flower on a piece of paper, kept it in his fist, then told me to name a flower.  He was visibly stunned that it didn't work.  I named 3 flowers and none of them matched what he wrote on the piece of paper.  He was trying to put the name of the flower in my head.

That'll be "cold reading".  Skilled practitioners can give the impression that they are reading your mind, when what they are actually doing is starting with vague generalities and then picking up on subtle non-verbal cues to narrow down specifics.

The name of the flower was probably "rose" or something.  Like when someone does basic mind reading tricks.  99 times out of 100, if you ask someone to think of a number between 1 and 10, they'll say 7.  Likewise, ask someone to quickly think of a vegetable, more often than not, they'll say "carrot".  These tricks work even more consistently if you tell the person to hurry.

 

ReplyQuote
Posted : 08/07/2017 5:33 am
(@samxtherapy)
Detective
Posted by: Oyster Bells
Posted by: SamXTherapy

Intuition... My take on that one is as prosaic as it gets.  There's no such thing.  There you go, I said it; Intuition does not exist.

What does exist, though, is an awful lot of background processing and analysis of absolutely everything we are exposed to, to the limit of our senses.  We are pattern seeking creatures with a long history of the ability to survive in very unfavourable conditions.  Not so surprising then, that we can make great cognitive leaps that seem like we're pulling ideas out of nowhere.

All my life I've been a very good guesser; I can often predict, with a very high degree of accuracy, what, where, why and how.  I'm not talking about silly stuff like, a plane crashing so don't get on it, more along the lines of being able to spot an economic trend long before anyone else, or know when a particular action will bring about a seemingly unexpected result.  Not that it's ever done me any good, you understand.  I'm a pragmatist at heart, so a few pounds in my pocket can buy me food/clothes/guitar strings etc, rather than go and buy shares in MegaWowCorp, or whatever.

We all absorb a lot more information than we realize; we all soak up stuff each and every day.  Some of us can - from time to time - put it together in useful and/or meaningful ways.  That's yer basic intuition.

On the same lines, you may as well ask where inspiration and imagination come from.  Same place, you learn to get into the right mode of thinking to make the connections happen.  Standing in a room with a few other people, some guitars, drums and amps can be a magical thing when you start to pull these amazing sounds out of thin air.

Once, I used to spend a long, long time on lyrics.  Now, most of the time, I listen to the basic tune or a couple of riffs, then sing whatever I think is appropriate.  It seems my background/subconscious/unconscious or whatever it's called this week is a lot smarter than I am.  I may not be Poet Laureate but I'll take the Pepsi challenge with any other lyric writer in the world.  I don't think I have ever turned out a nonsense or laughably bad lyric yet.

Can say the same for painting and drawing, too.  Somewhat different in my case, because as a graphic designer, I had the "art" part of artistry knocked right out of me.  Now, my stuff, such as it is, is just a representation of a mechanical skill.  As a result, I paint and draw very little, and the stuff I do is usually for other people, or as a showcase for something or other.

So, intuition, inspiration, creativity in general; all part of the 30 to 40 bits per second grey sponge in the head.  Nowt mystical about that.

I agree to an extent, what people call intuition is sometimes reading subtle datas and patterns.  Though not when you receive no data whatsoever, like when you sense someone related to you is in an accident.

Also, that's not the case with your tarot results working, is it?  Even if you pick up subtle datas, you can't make the cards that come out match that.

And you're a peculiar one.  ?  How did it start, for someone who doesn't believe in human soul, to be reading tarot cards?  It's like you're attracted to spiritualism, but refuse to believe in it.

Nope.  I didn't even know what they were, or what they were for, when I saw my first set.  My uncle had a set, which I liked the look of.  I never forgot about them, and years later, bought a set of my own just to have them.  Naturally, I decided to read up on them and, coincidentally, I was reading a set of books based on the tarot, written by Piers Anthony.  (I was a rather indiscriminate reader back then; nowadays I wouldn't have any of his books in the house but that's another story.)

I should point out that I am one of life's Big Red Button Pressers.  I have no idea if it's relevant but I am also autistic, which was something I investigated and discovered after my son had a diagnosis of autism.

Given the above, it's not too much of a leap to imagine I'd give them a go, for no better reason than to see what happened.  As it turned out, I am very, very good at reading them.  The idea I have about how they work is simple enough to say, maybe not so simple to understand.  I believe, in much the same way as we absorb everything around us, we exert a subtle but measurable influence on everything we interact with and some of this relates to the cards.  They could just as well be rocks, dice or lumps of cheese; the medium is definitely not the message in this case.  The interpretation of them depends entirely on the brain's ability to seek patterns and assign a "value" for want of a better word to what it sees.

So, in essence, I use those patterns as an aid to concentration, in order to define and refine all the "tells" and clues given by what I experienced.

Remember I said I was a good guesser?  You'd be amazed - or maybe not - by how much people give away about themselves without knowing it.  Additionally, I'm a firm believer that some people have, to a greater or lesser extent, the ability to read emotions and maybe even thoughts.  I don't consider those to be mystical or spiritual, though; just part of a natural process we don't know enough about.  Yet.

So, it's not that hard to answer questions with tarot.  I'd probably know most of the answer beforehand, anyhow.  It's just a matter of concentrating enough to get that last part out there.

But no, I'd not be able to pick the lottery numbers because I'm not predicting the future, just seeing the most likely outcomes from a limited number of circumstances.

Coppula eam se non posit acceptera jocularum

ReplyQuote
Posted : 08/07/2017 6:19 am
(@oyster_bells)
Roadhouse Regular
Posted by: snapsnappo

 

I'm also somewhat resistant to hypnosis.  One of my experiences in this was an Indian guy once came up to me out of the blue and started telling me true things about my past.  He had a mark on his forehead, wore traditional garments, and was middle-aged.  After that he wrote the name of a flower on a piece of paper, kept it in his fist, then told me to name a flower.  He was visibly stunned that it didn't work.  I named 3 flowers and none of them matched what he wrote on the piece of paper.  He was trying to put the name of the flower in my head.

That'll be "cold reading".  Skilled practitioners can give the impression that they are reading your mind, when what they are actually doing is starting with vague generalities and then picking up on subtle non-verbal cues to narrow down specifics.

The name of the flower was probably "rose" or something.  Like when someone does basic mind reading tricks.  99 times out of 100, if you ask someone to think of a number between 1 and 10, they'll say 7.  Likewise, ask someone to quickly think of a vegetable, more often than not, they'll say "carrot".  These tricks work even more consistently if you tell the person to hurry.

 

No, his readings weren't vague.  Come on.  He didn't say like "there's a powerful person who's jealous of you" or "lately something's been missing in your life."  He said some very specific things, and one of them contained a number.

The past 4 years going round the meditation circles I have met a lot of people with abilities.  And I have met a few quacks too.  It's very easy to tell the quacks now, not even by what they say, but by the way they act.

"Dougie, who do you prefer now, me or that Jade?"
"Jade."
"No, no, Dougie! Jade. Or. Me?"
"Me."
"Okay, once again. Jade. Or. Janey-E?"
"E."

ReplyQuote
Posted : 08/07/2017 6:49 am
(@oyster_bells)
Roadhouse Regular
Posted by: Paul Crossan

Apologies if this has already been answered but I have a problem with part 8.   So, when Bad Cooper and Ray escape from the prison they have an exchange about the information the latter has gleaned from Hastings's secretary, Betty. Ray says he has memorised the numbers and letters but he then attempts to extort money from Bad Cooper for the info. So far so good. Now flash forward a minute or two. Ray's left the car for a leak. Bad Cooper takes out the gun from the glove compartment and points it at Ray saying he wants the information. Ray turns around pointing his own gun at Bad Cooper (presumably supplied by the Prison Governor) and says something like "I tricked ya". So what does Bad Cooper do next? He tries to shoot Ray but the gun has been rigged and only fires blanks. My question is why would Bad Cooper even risk killing Ray who he has just sprung from jail and holds the vital information he is seeking in his head? This simply does not add up to me but I would dearly welcome views from others.

My guess is, Doppelgänger could've shot Ray somewhere not lethal so he could torture the coordinates out of him, before he killed him?

"Dougie, who do you prefer now, me or that Jade?"
"Jade."
"No, no, Dougie! Jade. Or. Me?"
"Me."
"Okay, once again. Jade. Or. Janey-E?"
"E."

ReplyQuote
Posted : 08/07/2017 6:53 am
(@oyster_bells)
Roadhouse Regular
Posted by: SamXTherapy

Nope.  I didn't even know what they were, or what they were for, when I saw my first set.  My uncle had a set, which I liked the look of.  I never forgot about them, and years later, bought a set of my own just to have them.  Naturally, I decided to read up on them and, coincidentally, I was reading a set of books based on the tarot, written by Piers Anthony.  (I was a rather indiscriminate reader back then; nowadays I wouldn't have any of his books in the house but that's another story.)

I should point out that I am one of life's Big Red Button Pressers.  I have no idea if it's relevant but I am also autistic, which was something I investigated and discovered after my son had a diagnosis of autism.

Given the above, it's not too much of a leap to imagine I'd give them a go, for no better reason than to see what happened.  As it turned out, I am very, very good at reading them.  The idea I have about how they work is simple enough to say, maybe not so simple to understand.  I believe, in much the same way as we absorb everything around us, we exert a subtle but measurable influence on everything we interact with and some of this relates to the cards.  They could just as well be rocks, dice or lumps of cheese; the medium is definitely not the message in this case.  The interpretation of them depends entirely on the brain's ability to seek patterns and assign a "value" for want of a better word to what it sees.

So, in essence, I use those patterns as an aid to concentration, in order to define and refine all the "tells" and clues given by what I experienced.

Remember I said I was a good guesser?  You'd be amazed - or maybe not - by how much people give away about themselves without knowing it.  Additionally, I'm a firm believer that some people have, to a greater or lesser extent, the ability to read emotions and maybe even thoughts.  I don't consider those to be mystical or spiritual, though; just part of a natural process we don't know enough about.  Yet.

So, it's not that hard to answer questions with tarot.  I'd probably know most of the answer beforehand, anyhow.  It's just a matter of concentrating enough to get that last part out there.

But no, I'd not be able to pick the lottery numbers because I'm not predicting the future, just seeing the most likely outcomes from a limited number of circumstances.

But Sam, each card in the deck has its specific meaning.  You can't just reappropriate every card to how you wanna see them.  One or two things may match and that's called coincidence, but you won't get good percentage of accuracy with coincidence.

I'm not sure if I remember correctly, but isn't one theory about how Tarot results can be accurate is basically the same with pendulum use : that we are asking our subconscious, and since our subconscious is connected to the hive, it knows more than we know?

Do you believe that some people can sense when someone close to them is in an accident half a world away, and they haven't been in touch a long time?  (No data whatsoever)

"Dougie, who do you prefer now, me or that Jade?"
"Jade."
"No, no, Dougie! Jade. Or. Me?"
"Me."
"Okay, once again. Jade. Or. Janey-E?"
"E."

ReplyQuote
Posted : 08/07/2017 7:25 am
(@samxtherapy)
Detective
Posted by: Oyster Bells
Posted by: Paul Crossan

Apologies if this has already been answered but I have a problem with part 8.   So, when Bad Cooper and Ray escape from the prison they have an exchange about the information the latter has gleaned from Hastings's secretary, Betty. Ray says he has memorised the numbers and letters but he then attempts to extort money from Bad Cooper for the info. So far so good. Now flash forward a minute or two. Ray's left the car for a leak. Bad Cooper takes out the gun from the glove compartment and points it at Ray saying he wants the information. Ray turns around pointing his own gun at Bad Cooper (presumably supplied by the Prison Governor) and says something like "I tricked ya". So what does Bad Cooper do next? He tries to shoot Ray but the gun has been rigged and only fires blanks. My question is why would Bad Cooper even risk killing Ray who he has just sprung from jail and holds the vital information he is seeking in his head? This simply does not add up to me but I would dearly welcome views from others.

My guess is, Doppelgänger could've shot Ray somewhere not lethal so he could torture the coordinates out of him, before he killed him?

Seems the most likely scenario.  OTOH, having seen Ray with a gun in his hand, he could have decided to shoot him anyhow and take his chances without the coordinates.

Coppula eam se non posit acceptera jocularum

ReplyQuote
Posted : 08/07/2017 7:25 am
(@lynn_watson)
Roadhouse Regular
Posted by: Oyster Bells
Posted by: Lynn Watson

At our local science centre they had a game called mindball - where you actually control the movement of this ball by relaxing.  Or if you know what you're doing you can make it roll backwards & forwards...  🙂

Lynn, tell me more about the balls, please!  ?

How accurate does the best person get it?  Like 80%?  Or 100%?  And it's at a science center???  How do they explain that in science??

Basically, the ball is controlled by your brainwaves - much like the needle on a polygraph.  They're usually found in science centres as the headsets have to be quite sensitive.  As you relax, the ball moves away from you - so you win by moving the ball right over to your opponent's side.  I've seen a couple of people who did yoga & meditation have a go at it - and the ball wasn't going anywhere fast!

ReplyQuote
Posted : 08/07/2017 1:57 pm
(@lynn_watson)
Roadhouse Regular
Posted by: Oyster Bells
Posted by: Lynn Watson

I've been very lucky not to have had depression - and recently, after learning a bit about Mindfulness, wonder if it's something to do with the fact I seem to do that as a default setting...?

And which Mindfulness do you mean?  In general being considerate of how others might feel, putting ourselves in people's shoes, doing nothing in excess sorta thing?  Or is it some specific spiritual teaching?

Hmm.  Just from this very limited forum interaction, I can tell you're a very calm and positive person.  And maybe that's why.  ?

How do you deal with jerks who try to give you a hard time though?  Or do they just not do that when with you?

Oh, it's none of those really - it's basically concentrating on the here-and-now and noticing everything around you.  So putting a positive spin on not mulling over stuff or running through to-do lists in your head.  It's one of those things that's touted as a bit of a cure-all, but it does seem to have evidence to back up its usefulness in mental health & pain management.
Chronic pain is your body (wrongly) running in crisis mode - so once you can recognise some of the 'vicious circles' & break them - e.g. unclenching your teeth, relaxing your shoulders - it all winds down a notch.

Anybody giving me a hard time gets a death stare and some pointed comments.  I used to be a teacher, so am used to stroppy teenagers.  Think Professor McGonagall in Harry Potter...  🙂

 

ReplyQuote
Posted : 08/07/2017 2:09 pm
(@death-bag)
RR Diner Patron
Posted by: Lynn Watson
Posted by: Oyster Bells
Posted by: Lynn Watson

At our local science centre they had a game called mindball - where you actually control the movement of this ball by relaxing.  Or if you know what you're doing you can make it roll backwards & forwards...  🙂

Lynn, tell me more about the balls, please!  ?

How accurate does the best person get it?  Like 80%?  Or 100%?  And it's at a science center???  How do they explain that in science??

Basically, the ball is controlled by your brainwaves - much like the needle on a polygraph.  They're usually found in science centres as the headsets have to be quite sensitive.  As you relax, the ball moves away from you - so you win by moving the ball right over to your opponent's side.  I've seen a couple of people who did yoga & meditation have a go at it - and the ball wasn't going anywhere fast!

Mindball would have to fun with a bottle of Jack Daniels and a six pack or two.  . .

('course most things are ?)

. . . we're not gonna talk about Judy . .

ReplyQuote
Posted : 08/07/2017 2:20 pm
(@droseth1)
Dweller
Posted by: Oyster Bells
Posted by: Dennis Roseth
Posted by: Roberto Bella
Posted by: Dennis Roseth

David Lynch has been practicing Trancendental Meditation (TM) for many years. As a practicer myself, I can assuredly say that it opens up the human mind in ways not fully understood. One of the ways is by experiencing the subjective. These are areas inside your mind or outside of your body near the Unified Field where things just get crazy and can't be objectively quantified. So yes I loved part eight because what he's doing makes sense to me. The lodges are in the subjective aether so anytime he's telling their story his art direction goes this way. When we are back in the objective world, the subjective seeps through as well. As far as spirits/entities go, quantum physics, and correct me if I'm wrong, postulates at least 9 other dimensions that we cannot experience. It is scientifically plausible that a nuclear explosion could open up those dimensions and that we are experiencing what looks like ghosts simply because in our dimension they may have to exist differently to get through.

Yes, I knew Lynch was deep into TM and assumed he got a lot of his concepts from it. I've meditated before, but not specifically in this way.

Since all matter is vibrational, many people who believe in spirit also believe there are overlapping planes of existence which we can't fully perceive as humans. Our reality is one plane, and perhaps what one might think of as "heaven" is at a higher vibration, and overlaid on this one. Mediums are people who can raise their vibrations to communicate with "spirits" who lower their vibrations to meet them in between.

And as fascinating as I find it all to be, I would also like to caution those who have no experience with this stuff to be very cautious. The abyss stares back. Far better to keep your eyes and focus on the light, as it were.

Another concept of reality that is entirely possible is that we do in fact live in a simulated reality. It's been theorized that once a civilization has the technological capability to create virtual realities, they surely will. What makes us think we're the 'original reality?' We could just be running on "god the supercomputer."

Yes. Buyer beware. TM Meditation teachers will tell you all about the bliss but not about the evil it will uncork in your brain. It can be a terrifying experience for some. Thankfully, once that stuff is purged it does seem to get more blissful over time.

Would you mind sharing some specifics about the terrifying experiences, Dennis?  And also Roberto?

I have contacted a TM instructor a while ago, but canceled our first meeting after seeing some people speaking up online.

The past 4 years or so, I have tried several types of meditation, but I happen to be somewhat slow to these things, it seems.  A few occasions I left halfway after learning that the organizations propagate things I'm against (prosperity teaching, sketchy worship of its founders).

 Also, I learned when I relax and breathe on a beach in shallow water, something strange happens.  A few gurus' responses were so apathetic when I asked them about this, that I became super weary when choosing a new teacher.

I'm also somewhat resistant to hypnosis.  One of my experiences in this was an Indian guy once came up to me out of the blue and started telling me true things about my past.  He had a mark on his forehead, wore traditional garments, and was middle-aged.  After that he wrote the name of a flower on a piece of paper, kept it in his fist, then told me to name a flower.  He was visibly stunned that it didn't work.  I named 3 flowers and none of them matched what he wrote on the piece of paper.  He was trying to put the name of the flower in my head.

Sure! TM can be very effective because it's the easiest way to meditate and the results are very real. I had a lot of trauma locked away deep inside my brain from a very rough childhood. In a about 6 months of doing TM twice a day every day it un-corked that trauma and it all came out at once. It was horrifying and led me to be depressed and suicidal. I had to get treatment and stop the meditation for a while. Once that cleared up the meditation became much more blissful. It sounds like a bad experience but in reality, I needed to get that stuff out, it was killing me. So I still recommend TM or some form of meditation to everyone but I make sure they know what can happen if you have severe amounts of stored trauma. BTW, one of the easiest and most effective non-TM ways to do this is EMDR. I do both. Just be careful and make sure the people in your life know what to do in case you get into trouble.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 09/07/2017 7:24 pm
(@oyster_bells)
Roadhouse Regular

Wow.  Thank you, Dennis....  Hmm, I'm looking for meditation mainly to help with physical illness and blocked creativity.  I do have some anger towards things and situations, and I thought it would help if meditation can sorta push that away.  But now after having some strange experiences, I'm looking for a teacher who can explain what happened, or at least care enough to help me find out on my own.  Sorry that I made you share that in public, Dennis, I had no idea....

"Dougie, who do you prefer now, me or that Jade?"
"Jade."
"No, no, Dougie! Jade. Or. Me?"
"Me."
"Okay, once again. Jade. Or. Janey-E?"
"E."

ReplyQuote
Posted : 09/07/2017 8:10 pm
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