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Jacques Renault at Lucky Insurance ?  

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(@carol-ozoo)
Owl

I know its not even the same actor  (Walter Olkewicz/Bob Stephenson) but they look like each other so much that it cant be without purpose.

 

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This topic was modified 2 weeks  ago by carol ozoo
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Posted : 29/10/2018 2:47 pm Murat Erol Özkan liked
(@murat_erol_ozkan)
Roadhouse Regular

Maybe the similarity indicates(by showing the criminal Jacques) how the 'good' Dougie and the 'good world' of Las Vegas are compromised by corruption and illegality, how Cooper is complicit in such an endeavor by taking what is inherently corrupt and presenting it as just 'good ol' cherry pie and coffee', how the same crimes are discounted and appear as acceptable.  Right next to Jacques is Anthony who is currently involved in organized crime and is friends with Dougie.  Its true that Dougie 'busts' Anthony, but then he later goes on to form his own criminal connections and even compromises Mullins into participating with the Mitchums, thereby corrupting the entire institution.   For Dougie, it was either working with the Mitchums or being dead, as Mullins informs him before he gets into the limo,  but both Mullins and Dougie end up enjoying the criminality and fully participating, and this is simply 'how things work' around Las Vegas, much like the Bookhouse Boys keeping things 'how they like it' and blaming everything on some external evil 'out in the woods' that comes out of nowhere. 

  Las Vegas is a normalized and acceptable criminality, a world of 'Bill Shakers' and 'Candy Shakers', much like the service that Jacques was running in Twin Peaks, maybe this only looked so horrible through the illusion of Laura and Twin Peaks, the idea that something is worthwhile regardless of money/power, that people are free and important, while here the same crimes are going on and sold easily, fully opened up to and tolerant money exchange and power domination, full enjoyment without restriction or limit,  with full on acceptance by the general population.  This also resonates with Cooper's initial problem of wanting to find the 'true world' where people still live with decency outside of corrupted Philadelphia and was looking for it in Twin Peaks, and Twin Peaks not living up to this culminated in Coopers madness.  Dougie himself in Las Vegas was involved with Jade and then Candy Shaker, after joining a criminal mafia under threat of death, with the melancholia attached to it; and even later goes on to excuse it all and enjoy it, showing that Dougie is not as innocent as he appears, he even betrayed his beliefs about Twin Peaks/Laura, the rule of law, right/wrong, etc.

Also, around the same time in the series, we see an insurance salesman of the similar demeanor and physical build as the Jacques lookalike above appearing at Twin Peaks Sheriffs station and offering insurance to Sheriff Truman through a conversation with Lucy.  My first thought is that this hints at the similarity of Twin Peaks to the corrupted world of Las Vegas, the dark underside of Twin Peaks and it money/power intrigue(Ben Horne, Catherine, Josie, et al), and of course Jacques and Laura, etc.   In this case, does Mr. C now not appear in a different light in his search for Judy and disruption?  Mr. C is now emerging as the true hero seeking to disrupted the corrupted mess of Las Vegas and Twin Peaks, the one who did not betray the truth of the tragicomedy that happened to Laura and stood up for what is right.....

This post was modified 2 weeks  ago 2 times by Murat Erol Özkan
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Posted : 31/10/2018 2:27 pm
(@dobbshead)
Roadhouse Regular

I'm almost at the point of picking up what you're laying down here. 

The normalization of lawlessness, vigilantism, vengeance, exploitation, and deceptions.  Is all this acceptable for our 'heroes'? What exactly makes someone else the villain then?  Does the context matter?  Physical attractiveness?  Just a fetching smile?

Is all that is necessary for evil to take root is for good men to do nothing?  Or eagerly take part, perhaps.  Brings me around to one of my first questions:  Is the Polish accountant a hero or a villain?    Is outcome the only metric for good vs evil? 

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Posted : 02/11/2018 11:34 pm Brandy Fisher liked
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