Recurring themes in Episode 10 and elsewhere  

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(@pine-cone)
Dweller

Much has been written here and elsewhere of DL's use of color, especially the color red, perhaps signifying passion, blood, etc. The use of pink was discussed by NYT reviewer Noel Murray today in his Episode 10 summary. I'm curious to know how the hive mind interprets these color-infused themes.

But wait.. There's more. Upon reflection, did anyone else notice the role money has played throughout each episode? The Mitchum brothers' frame-up with Dougie as villain? Richard's terrifying family hold-up? Steven's crazy rant? Mr. Jackpots? Maybe money- luck- chance, are themes that warrant further consideration.

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Posted : 17/07/2017 1:12 pm
(@fishinthepercolator)
RR Diner Patron

There's been a lot of red things in every season, another one I noticed in this episode is the red mug thrown out of Becky and Steven's trailer window when they're fighting.

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Posted : 17/07/2017 1:19 pm
Pine Cone and groofay liked
(@lynn_watson)
Roadhouse Regular

Also Hawk's coin - 'follow the money'?

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Posted : 17/07/2017 6:56 pm
Pine Cone liked
(@fumiko)
Roadhouse Regular

 

Arguably the most disturbing scenes in the entire series also involved money: 

- Right before the frog-wasp enters the mouth of "Girl, 1956", we see her pick up a penny and note that it is "heads" (Lincoln) and that it must be her lucky day. 

- When Richard Horne is having his whole "don't call me kid" moment, Red does his magic coin flip and tells him "Heads I win, Tails you lose."  

So both involved money.  As did Ray/Darya's betrayal of Evil Coop.  

Money has always played a vital role in the Twin Peaks universe though.  One suspects unseen forces are influencing people's actions and motives, causing them to constantly scheme and counter-scheme against one another, all in the interests of acquiring more money.  You could even argue the lodge entities treat garmanbozia like a currency, in as much as it can be "stolen".   I mean the ancillary plots of pretty much all of the original episodes involved one character trying to screw over the other to acquire their property, only to realize they had been counter-screwed, but then later to learn that they've been counter-counter-screwed.  

It's a nice distraction. 

As for the colors, what I picked up on was that Mrs. Sullivan (Hodges?) little trailer had a very green hue all around it. Lots of nature.  I associated that with her good spirit, being more in harmony with the world - but I see others think the green was related to the yellow/green of pain and suffering.  To be honest, I'm not sure how to interpret ALL of the colors here. 

Pink was heavily used  in the last episode, from the casino girls costumes to the many beverages being consumed.  What exactly it means, I have no idea.  If I do some subconscious word association on my own, it seems my own subconscious interprets pink as being: 

- feminine

- girlie

- soft

- nice

A bit like an adolescent girl, if you will.  Which is kind of interesting since Candie seems to have the mind of a child trapped in a physically mature woman's body, and we've seen Nadine (who was drinking something pink) have an actual episode where she thought she was a little girl. 

I'm probably barking up the wrong tree here. 

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Posted : 18/07/2017 8:59 am
(@ruskinowl)
Roadhouse Regular
Posted by: kdawg68

 Money has always played a vital role in the Twin Peaks universe though.

 

Money is currency. It flows. Like an electrical current. Current/currency. See? 

Electrical currents play a mahoosive part in Twin Peaks, and at the very least is somewhat sinister. Currency.

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Posted : 18/07/2017 9:08 am
(@iban-manzano)
Lodger

Misoginy and how the world deals with women are anorther recurrent themes in this episode in particular and in The Return in general.

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Posted : 18/07/2017 9:21 am
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