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What happens with Candie?  

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(@iban-manzano)
Lodger

Firstly, she looks deeply grieved when she realizes of the stupid dammage caused to her box and then, in the Casino, she starts to act like if she was lost in her own thoughts, with a hidden agenda. I think that she could be conspiring against the brothers.

Maybe, is she going to be a help for Dougie when he finally has the meeting with the brothers?

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Posted : 17/07/2017 6:15 am Tchounkui Roland liked
(@eric-from-sweden)
RR Diner Patron

When she talked to that Insurance guy in the casino, I couldn't help but laugh. It was kinda funny and I guess it was intended that way. She looked ridiculous on that surveillance camera.

https://youtu.be/NpYEJx7PkWE

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Posted : 17/07/2017 6:29 am
(@monique)
Dweller

I wondered if she was telling Insurance Man the story of Dougie winning the jackpots, the way she was pointing and making sweeping gestures ~ i can imagine her saying "and all the jackpots started going off, all of them!

Or perhaps she's just super high on  something and unable to stay focused on the task at hand?

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Posted : 17/07/2017 6:51 am Bob Michaels, Rob John Goodin and Roberto Bella liked
(@fumiko)
Roadhouse Regular

Posted this earlier in another thread so apologies for repeating: 

 

Call me crazy, but I think somethng related to Laura is going on with that Candie girl from the casino.

  • in episode 1, Leland tells Cooper to "find Laura", suggesting she is missing somewhere. 
  • Log lady's message talks about dying glow, but says Laura is the one and that the circle is almost complete
  • In an episode absolutely FILLED with images of people interacting with doorways/windows, we get the ultimate "WTF???" moment when Gordon opens his door to see the Laura apparition.  I believe these were from clips when Laura first learned her father was the killer
  • Then, we see "Candie" at the casino, only she's acting a little spacey.  She's not responding to verbal cues the way those around her suspect, and then we see her acting very confused out on the casino floor.  Jeez, who does that sound like?  Dougie. 
  • I think there might be another clue here, in that this horrible, monstrous casino owner dude, who we've see violently assault his former floor manager, seems to be a softie when it comes to Candie.  "She's got nowhere else to go",  "C'mon Candie, it's okay, really!"  Who could turn the Grinch's heart?  Only "the one", right? 

Also went looking after last night for the actress who plays Candie (Amie Shiels).  There's a few articles out there about her role (like everything else) being both highly secretive and her being hand-picked by Lynch's casting director for this particular part - which you can now bet your bottom dollar will be a lot more than her simply being "casino bimbo #1" or however you thought of her from the few artistic shots we'd have of her and her ensemble trio of pink ladies in prior episodes. 

 

She matters - and I'm pretty sure it's connected to Laura. 

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Posted : 17/07/2017 2:26 pm This is Dougie\'s Coffee, Sammy Weir and 100monkeys liked
(@murat_erol_ozkan)
Roadhouse Regular

Mitchum was ignoring her/the fly(not interested in something exceptional that you have to deal with, just the work), she then hit him in anger, followed by beginning to question Mitchum and the world they provide for her, she no longer is seduced by it(how can you think I love you, etc., she already is out of desire for the Mitchums and they know it, she is no longer capable of acting to their standards).   In other words, what she is trying to say is: I am no longer at your 'version level', its going to be hot and humid tomorrow, and I dont need your air conditioning.  She was purposely angering the Mitchums by talking excessively to Anthony.

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Posted : 17/07/2017 3:17 pm
(@b-randy)
Chief Moderator

Did she hit him in anger or did she hit the fly in "anger" and consequentially hit him too because of what ever detachment/fugue or whatever issue is that she is having. It seemed to me that she didn't even know he was there until the remote made contact with his face.

And yes, he was far more forgiving that I could have anticipated.  I thought he was going to flip out on her.

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Posted : 17/07/2017 3:48 pm Lynn Watson liked
(@ric_bissell)
Deputy
Posted by: Ibán Manzano

Firstly, she looks deeply grieved when she realizes of the stupid dammage caused to her box...

Hi Ibán,

Oh, NO!!  Candie damaged her box !!?!!  Damn.

- /< /\ /> -

That's strange - even for Cooper

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Posted : 17/07/2017 4:42 pm
(@iban-manzano)
Lodger
Posted by: Ric Bissell
Posted by: Ibán Manzano

Firstly, she looks deeply grieved when she realizes of the stupid dammage caused to her box...

Hi Ibán,

Oh, NO!!  Candie damaged her box !!?!!  Damn.

- /< /\ /> -

Sorry, "boss". I don't know why I can't edit the post.

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Posted : 17/07/2017 5:19 pm Ric Bissell liked
(@chris_sampson)
RR Diner Patron

Also note that the scene with the three pink girls where Candie was waving her arm was in an earlier episode; strange.  

"We're in the version layer..."

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Posted : 17/07/2017 5:43 pm
(@murat_erol_ozkan)
Roadhouse Regular
Posted by: Brandy Fisher

Did she hit him in anger or did she hit the fly in "anger" and consequentially hit him too because of what ever detachment/fugue or whatever issue is that she is having. It seemed to me that she didn't even know he was there until the remote made contact with his face.

And yes, he was far more forgiving that I could have anticipated.  I thought he was going to flip out on her.

I think initially she was consciously just trying to hit the fly, then out of nowhere she 'snapped' into hitting him after she saw him disregard the fly and go right back to work, as if disregarding her presence and efforts.  later she realized and began to think and form what happened as her betraying them and their 'love' decisively, thats why she was crying during the local news and is now basically against them, and they know it.

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Posted : 17/07/2017 11:35 pm
(@silentbobni)
Roadhouse Regular

I've saw a few theories kicking around that she's Laura in the same way that Dougie is Cooper. 

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Posted : 18/07/2017 11:26 pm
(@fishinthepercolator)
RR Diner Patron

I don't think she was somehow conspiring when she was talking with the insurance guy as she was surrounded by security guys. But yeah, I bet there's something more about her.

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Posted : 19/07/2017 7:54 am
(@fumiko)
Roadhouse Regular

It seems to me that she's flaking out in a fashion similar to Dougie.  She seems confused, disoriented.  She may have been repeating what was on the news (the weather report that either followd or preceded the Ike the Spike news) when she spoke with Tom Sizemore.  

I'm guessing she's either someone's doppleganger, or maybe she's involved in whatever is happening with Laura that Gordon picked up on. 

We keep hearing "she's the one", and we were told Cooper needed to "find Laura". I found it rather interesting that after hitting the casino dude with the remote, Candie broke down sobbing uncontrollably.  Which is basically what Laura was doing in the scene from FWWM that was ghostly overlayed on Gordon's doorway threshold.  In that scene, Candie is asking how anyone can love her after what she's done.  In the overlayed Laura scene, Laura is demanding that Donna reassert her uconditional friendship (having just learned her own father was raping her for much of her life).  I can't help but think those are connected.   In a really weird way, her cries about "how can you love me after what I've done" are about what I'd suspect Leland's soul went through right before he died (when Bob "pulled the string" and let him realize fully what he'd been party to). 

So I don't know.  But I suspect that if Laura, like Bob, was from a blob/orb, then the simple act of Leland/Bob striking her down wouldn't be enough to kill her spirit forever. Just like shooting EvilCoop didn't seem to keep him down for long either.  And nobody thinks Bob is dead from that, do they?  

The only other time we've seen her (Candie) she was doing that weird, wavy motion with her hand, which was kind of similar to what Mike was doing in his appearance to Dougie/Coop when he implored him to "wake up".   Maybe she was picking up on that, or reacting to it for some reason? 

Maybe she's waking up?  Maybe part of Laura's spirit is with her?   Whatever it is, I suspect she'll be a bit more than just an ancillary character swatting flies as we go forward.  

"She's got nowhere else to go". 

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Posted : 19/07/2017 8:34 am Sammy Weir, Badalamenti Fan, Lynn Watson and 1 people liked
(@myn0k)
Deputy

I'm certain in the very first episode, Duncan Todd says something like "have you found the girl, she's good enough", or something like that. 

I thought at the time they were referring to a girl who has been chosen to do something important. I wonder if Candie is the one. Ie she's a plant. 

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Posted : 19/07/2017 1:22 pm SamXTherapy liked
(@badalamenti-fan)
Roadhouse Regular

Kdawg68, I think you're on to something here.

I recall another forum contributor posited that perhaps the peculiarities of Janey-E's and Sonny Jim's behavior  suggest the pair could be either a) benevolent spirits from another reality/universe/plane of existence, akin to those that guided Mr. Jackpot's slot-machine streak and "Dougie's" insurance investigation; or, b) non-human or supernatural creations of Mr. C, built to provide his Dougie Jones golem (b. 1997) a plausible context/biography for the Rancho Rosa/Lucky 7 Insurance/greater Las Vegas communities.

With this in mind, I'd like to propose an amibitious, if intriguing, hypothesis regarding Candie, Mandy and Sandy. Lynch often uses subtle editing to 'subliminally' manipulate the viewer's affect/psychological orientation (e.g., the 'snap' effect from slow-motion to normal-speed as Tammy approaches Gordon's Mayfair Hotel room contributes to an uneasy sense of Laura's lingering spectral presence ; the recycling of previous scene-setting footage such as the green-to-red stoplight that I believe first marks out  Laura's fateful departure from James' motorcycle near the 'logging road at Sparkwood and 21' carries this tragic association in its subsequent appearances).

Given the uncanny editing that first introduces Candie, Mandy and Sandy-- whereby their physical presence in the casino security room is not at all certain (iirc, they are visible only during cuts to their pose against the wall, not in the other shots of this scene).... 

...moreover, given the interpretive exertion required to explain/justify the eccentricities of Candie's behavior (e.g., 'she's on drugs,' 'she's in an emotionally abusive/co-dependent relationship with the Mitchum brothers,' 'she's secretly conspiring against them)....

... is it any more far-fetched to suggest that they might, in fact, be a trio of benevolent spirits corollary to the malevolent trio of spirits comprising  The Man from Another Place, BOB and The Jumping Man (seen together in the crucial scene in FWWM of the 'room above a convenience store,' alongside other souls/spirits/Woodsmen, IIRC)?

Consider:

The Man from Another Place ("From Pure Air We Have Descended," and "I Am The Arm and I Sound Like This: Woo-woo-woo-woo-woo!"-- the sound that accompanies Deer Meadow Telephone Pole #6)  explicitly reminds us of the close association between his cohort of evil garmonbozia-seekers and two elemental forces:

   1) Electricity

  2) "Pure Air"

Lightning-- natural occurring electricity-- descends from "pure air," just as Phillip Jeffries appears-- with evident burn marks-- in the Buenos Aires hotel in "The Missing Pieces."

Arguably, Lynch's preoccupation throughout the Twin Peaks saga is the coeval, contiguous and continuous quality of Good and Evil as constituent of "human nature"-- you can't have one without the other, the potential for both resides in each of us. Consider, for instance, the floor of the Red Room, where one can see the iconography of the two peaks (for purposes of this reading, the Black and White Lodges) fitted flush together, the ground upon which doubles of good/innocent human souls reside as evil Doppelgängern.

For me, it stands to reason that the breeziness or "airiness" of Candie's personality might correspond to her as-yet unrevealed (or, perhaps never to be revealed) status as an elemental mythical archetype -- a representation of pure ingenuousness, naivete, child-like innocence, and ultimately, life (air-- oxygen, etc.)  On a material level, the trio's cocktail dresses appear buoyant, much in the manner that a ballerina's traditional costume enhances the illusion of defying gravity. Candie's signature gesture is now the "hand-wave" that readily invites association with not only currents of air, breezes, etc. but also, more abstractly, the "triangle wave" shape of the Red Room floor (c.f. mathematical/graphic representations of electrical current, sound waves-- 'I sound like this!', etc.)

Finally, the affect that Candie's, Mandy's and Sandy's scenes introduce might be described as one of comic absurdity juxtaposed with surreal beauty,  a striking foil to the grotesque, hysterical  terror of the  FWWM scene depicting the denizens of the "room above a convenience store," in which a monkey's face and the color-inverted face akin to the makeup caked onto the "jumping man" alternate with shots of the other 'residents.' 

Last, and, perhaps, most tendentiously:  the trio's naming schema, implied innocence and peripheral-yet-clearly-important status in the narrative each echo Richard Wagner's Rhinemaidens-- Woglinde, Flosshilde and Wellgunde-- a trio of water nymphs who, unknowingly, set in motion the dramatic action that brings about the end of the reign of the gods-- and, by extension, the integrity of the natural world-- in Der Ring des Nibelungen.  Indeed, perhaps the only dramatic precedent for Lynch's "18-hour film" narrative arc is Wagner's 18-hour (with long intermissions) operatic narrative arc.

Food for thought.  

PS:   The Cowboy and Rebekah del Rio in Mulholland Drive, as well as the Mystery Man in Lost Highway function similarly to how I propose Candie, Mandy and Sandy might be understood.  Each appears uncannily at a crucial juncture in the narrative and seem to inexplicably set in motion a drive toward new character doublings (mitosis?) or narrative resolutions. 

 

 

 

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Posted : 19/07/2017 1:32 pm kdawg68 liked
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