James's Doppelbanger Guitar  

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(@samxtherapy)
Detective
Posted by: Karen
Posted by: SamXTherapy
Posted by: charlesheld
Posted by: Ame Solitaire

Sounded exactly the same...

I'm pretty sure they simply used the same audio from the original series.

Indeed.  In any case, did anyone really think they actually perform live in those sequences?  If so, the Chromatics have a keyboard player who is a ninja, or owns a cloaking device.

Just like the hiding drummer & bass player in original show version of "just you & I."

And like Bowie tried on the Diamond Dogs/Philly Dogs tour, but the band were having none of it.

Coppula eam se non posit acceptera jocularum

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Posted : 07/08/2017 9:48 pm
(@emster)
Town Visitor

And looked like Silvertone Amp like they used to sell in Sears Catalogs of my youth....

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Posted : 11/08/2017 11:24 am
(@ame-solitaire)
RR Diner Patron
Posted by: Brandy Fisher

Did anyone notice James actually "playing" the guitar.  Yes, I know he wasn't organically playing it, it was a sound stage.  But he actually missed a chord and tried to compensate for it.

In the original series, he used a completely different strumming technique. Very funny...

«That's the kind of girl to make you wish you spoke a little French».
- Gordon Cole.

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Posted : 11/08/2017 11:34 am
(@buttercup)
Deputy

James guitar skill is limited at best to faking chords and clumsily finger picking.  I won't even comment on the vocals.  Yet I truly enjoyed the performance.  Not only was it the nostalgia factor, but I was so surprised that it actually happened after reading so much about it here.  I figured people were going nuts.  It was at that moment that I decided to join the forum.  I was propelled into action.  Thank you James.

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Posted : 11/08/2017 11:40 am
(@arcadesonfire)
Roadhouse Regular
Posted by: SamXTherapy
Posted by: charlesheld
Posted by: SamXTherapy

Indeed.  In any case, did anyone really think they actually perform live in those sequences?  If so, the Chromatics have a keyboard player who is a ninja, or owns a cloaking device.

No, I know they're all lip-syncing.  But they could have had Mr. Marshall sing anew with the surrogate Donna & Madeleine.

I'm sticking with the ninja keyboard player theory.  May not be right but it's way more fun.

We used to have a ninja drummer; always went invisible when gear needed moving.

I believe a lot of the Chromatics synth sounds are made using the guitar and relatively recent Electro Harmonix pedals--the POG2, one of the Freeze pedals, and other such stuff that builds upon your guitar wave form as a synth would build upon a simple wave form.

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Posted : 11/08/2017 3:04 pm
(@arcadesonfire)
Roadhouse Regular

I don't know about the guitar, but James's singing was definitely new. It was much more gruff than the original. Umm, I could be wrong, but I'm pretty sure I'm definitely right... And now I know how Audrey feels.

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Posted : 11/08/2017 3:05 pm
(@tibiusreynolds)
Dweller

The backup singers sounded different to me actually. But I haven't done a spectral comparison or anything.

Anyway, the fact that an $900 Epiphone sounds like a $10,000 Gibson is a secret known to guitarists everywhere.

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Posted : 11/08/2017 4:04 pm
(@ame-solitaire)
RR Diner Patron
Posted by: TibiusReynolds

The backup singers sounded different to me actually. But I haven't done a spectral comparison or anything.

Anyway, the fact that an $900 Epiphone sounds like a $10,000 Gibson is a secret known to guitarists everywhere.

The tone is in your fingers,

«That's the kind of girl to make you wish you spoke a little French».
- Gordon Cole.

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Posted : 11/08/2017 4:06 pm
(@samxtherapy)
Detective

With all due respect, an Epiphone does not sound like a Gibson, without some serious cash spent on upgrades.  I speak from experience because I owned both.

I have a Gibson Les Paul Standard which is stock everything.  The only thing that sets it apart from most standards is gold hardware, which Gibson put on a limited run of standards each year.

I later bought an Epiphone Les Paul, which, although it had a lovely neck and was well finished overall, the tuners were cheap and nasty, the pots were typical cheap Far East "All or Nothings", the (Gibson designed) pickups were pure, unadulterated mud and the nut was a joke.

In retrospect, I would have been better off buying a used Les Paul Studio but I liked the look of the Epi.  It was a decent enough guitar - once I'd spent money on it - but no way on earth was it ever as good as the Gibson.  A while later, I sold the Epi.  Still have the Gibson.

Coppula eam se non posit acceptera jocularum

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Posted : 11/08/2017 7:02 pm
(@tibiusreynolds)
Dweller

A moron and his bad guitar.

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Posted : 12/08/2017 2:57 pm
(@arcadesonfire)
Roadhouse Regular
Posted by: Ame Solitaire
Posted by: TibiusReynolds

The backup singers sounded different to me actually. But I haven't done a spectral comparison or anything.

Anyway, the fact that an $900 Epiphone sounds like a $10,000 Gibson is a secret known to guitarists everywhere.

The tone is in your fingers,

Word

ReplyQuote
Posted : 12/08/2017 3:05 pm
(@samxtherapy)
Detective

Where did I say anyone who owns an Epiphone is a moron?  Where, in fact, did I say Epiphones are bad guitars?

That particular series - and at that particular time - are fine instruments, well built and highly regarded.  Even now, they are far better than the vast majority of Epiphones out there.

When the one McCartney's pictured with was built, Epiphone was still a maker of high quality instruments.  Now, they are primarily known for budget guitars made in the Far East, down to a price, not up to a spec.

There are - before you come back with it - a number of well built Epiphones with quality hardware made even now but the majority are the low ticket jobs.

You are comparing apples to oranges and putting words into other's mouths.

Coppula eam se non posit acceptera jocularum

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Posted : 12/08/2017 3:08 pm
(@myn0k)
Deputy
Posted by: SamXTherapy

With all due respect, an Epiphone does not sound like a Gibson, without some serious cash spent on upgrades.  I speak from experience because I owned both.

I have a Gibson Les Paul Standard which is stock everything.  The only thing that sets it apart from most standards is gold hardware, which Gibson put on a limited run of standards each year.

I later bought an Epiphone Les Paul, which, although it had a lovely neck and was well finished overall, the tuners were cheap and nasty, the pots were typical cheap Far East "All or Nothings", the (Gibson designed) pickups were pure, unadulterated mud and the nut was a joke.

In retrospect, I would have been better off buying a used Les Paul Studio but I liked the look of the Epi.  It was a decent enough guitar - once I'd spent money on it - but no way on earth was it ever as good as the Gibson.  A while later, I sold the Epi.  Still have the Gibson.

I had exactly the same experience with my Epi Les Paul. 

Oddly enough I sold mine to a collector of Epi Les Pauls. I didn't understand his love for them but then I wasn't going to argue. 

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Posted : 12/08/2017 3:11 pm
(@samxtherapy)
Detective
Posted by: Myn0k
Posted by: SamXTherapy

With all due respect, an Epiphone does not sound like a Gibson, without some serious cash spent on upgrades.  I speak from experience because I owned both.

I have a Gibson Les Paul Standard which is stock everything.  The only thing that sets it apart from most standards is gold hardware, which Gibson put on a limited run of standards each year.

I later bought an Epiphone Les Paul, which, although it had a lovely neck and was well finished overall, the tuners were cheap and nasty, the pots were typical cheap Far East "All or Nothings", the (Gibson designed) pickups were pure, unadulterated mud and the nut was a joke.

In retrospect, I would have been better off buying a used Les Paul Studio but I liked the look of the Epi.  It was a decent enough guitar - once I'd spent money on it - but no way on earth was it ever as good as the Gibson.  A while later, I sold the Epi.  Still have the Gibson.

I had exactly the same experience with my Epi Les Paul. 

Oddly enough I sold mine to a collector of Epi Les Pauls. I didn't understand his love for them but then I wasn't going to argue. 

Sold mine to buy Mrs Therapy's wedding ring.  How's that for romantic?

Coppula eam se non posit acceptera jocularum

ReplyQuote
Posted : 12/08/2017 3:20 pm
(@myn0k)
Deputy
Posted by: SamXTherapy
Posted by: Myn0k
Posted by: SamXTherapy

With all due respect, an Epiphone does not sound like a Gibson, without some serious cash spent on upgrades.  I speak from experience because I owned both.

I have a Gibson Les Paul Standard which is stock everything.  The only thing that sets it apart from most standards is gold hardware, which Gibson put on a limited run of standards each year.

I later bought an Epiphone Les Paul, which, although it had a lovely neck and was well finished overall, the tuners were cheap and nasty, the pots were typical cheap Far East "All or Nothings", the (Gibson designed) pickups were pure, unadulterated mud and the nut was a joke.

In retrospect, I would have been better off buying a used Les Paul Studio but I liked the look of the Epi.  It was a decent enough guitar - once I'd spent money on it - but no way on earth was it ever as good as the Gibson.  A while later, I sold the Epi.  Still have the Gibson.

I had exactly the same experience with my Epi Les Paul. 

Oddly enough I sold mine to a collector of Epi Les Pauls. I didn't understand his love for them but then I wasn't going to argue. 

Sold mine to buy Mrs Therapy's wedding ring.  How's that for romantic?

I sold mine to get the deposit for an emergency new home to rent, as it turned out our neighbour at the time was a psychopath who liked to bang on the walls and threaten that he'll "get you with his hatchet". 

 

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Posted : 12/08/2017 3:23 pm
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