Could the pace within scenes be a metaphor for...  

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(@mirella)
Town Visitor

... The mental state of Dale Cooper?

With other words if Dougie Jones learns more and more and slowly activates his mind, into becoming the Dale Cooper we all know, will the overall pace within scenes change/speed up as well? What are your thoughts? 

Quote
Posted : 01/08/2017 10:09 am
(@samxtherapy)
Detective

If the complaints about episode 12 are anything to go by, no.

Otherwise, it's an interesting idea but I haven't been aware of any increasing tempo, overall.

One notable use - in comics - was in The Death Of Superman, where the panels per page decreased with each issue.

Coppula eam se non posit acceptera jocularum

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Posted : 01/08/2017 10:13 am
(@ezekielmoist)
RR Diner Patron

I think people should stop watching Twin Peaks looking for facts , just plot's mania.  There's already every other TV show for that! 

Get an emotional point of view or stop watching it. 

 

There's nothing quite like urinating out in the open air

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Posted : 01/08/2017 10:36 am
(@b-randy)
Chief Moderator

Or how about watch it any way you want with any POV that suits you.

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Posted : 01/08/2017 10:44 am
(@yambag021)
RR Diner Patron
Posted by: ezekielmoist

I think people should stop watching Twin Peaks looking for facts , just plot's mania.  There's already every other TV show for that! 

Get an emotional point of view or stop watching it. 

 

My emotional point of view is boredom.

There's points where I get excited, and they end it as soon as not starts. I still have faith lynch cleans it up nice and ties everything together, but my fear he will set this up for a season 4, which won't happen, increases week by week.

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Posted : 01/08/2017 11:34 am
(@badalamenti-fan)
Roadhouse Regular
Posted by: Yambag021
Posted by: ezekielmoist

I think people should stop watching Twin Peaks looking for facts , just plot's mania.  There's already every other TV show for that! 

Get an emotional point of view or stop watching it. 

 

My emotional point of view is boredom.

There's points where I get excited, and they end it as soon as not starts. I still have faith lynch cleans it up nice and ties everything together, but my fear he will set this up for a season 4, which won't happen, increases week by week.

Why is such formal closure-- the tying up of loose ends-- important or necessary?  

I think viewers have come to expect a certain sort of "clever" dénoument that satisfies because it provides psychological comfort. Our world is morally ambiguous, disorderly, and uncertain, but narrative fiction can instead be utterly rational and "closed."

But I think the metaphor we might be searching for is the inevitability of death/decay and the disorder, ambiguity and uncertainty of human understanding of our condition.

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Posted : 01/08/2017 12:33 pm
(@nick1218)
Lodger

I usually roll my eyes at points like this but I think you may have something with this one

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Posted : 01/08/2017 12:59 pm
(@colin_basterfield)
RR Diner Patron

I was musing this yesterday and commented somewhere about it.

When Sarah Palmer was having her episode in the store, the tension was palpable. In this scene she left the store muttering, but at any moment, something will happen to yank the rug from under me, leaving me in the woods, alone, at night, disturbed. (I'm a sensitive soul, but striving to embrace wholeness, whatever that entails within me)

An almost perfect example of creating tension is the Winkies scene in Mulholland Drive. I love that scene, btw, the over the shoulder camera and reverse shot work is brilliant.

The build up with Sarah was similar to this and although it didn't happen this time, I think it's fair to assume one of these seemingly innocuous scenes will do a real number on us, and that for me is the magic of this show, and always has been.

At any given moment, no knock, no doorbell... 

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Posted : 01/08/2017 2:32 pm
(@badalamenti-fan)
Roadhouse Regular
Posted by: Colin Basterfield

I was musing this yesterday and commented somewhere about it.

When Sarah Palmer was having her episode in the store, the tension was palpable. In this scene she left the store muttering, but at any moment, something will happen to yank the rug from under me, leaving me in the woods, alone, at night, disturbed. (I'm a sensitive soul, but striving to embrace wholeness, whatever that entails within me)

An almost perfect example is the Winkies scene in Mulholland Drive and the tension created there from two guys having a meal. I love that scene, btw, the over the shoulder camera and reverse shot work is brilliant.

The build up with Sarah was similar to this and although it didn't happen this time, I think it's fair to assume one of these seemingly innocuous scenes will do a real number on us, and that for me is the magic of this show, and always has been.

At any given moment, no knock, no doorbell... 

OMG. I couldn't agree more. The Winkies' scene in Mulholland Drive and The Visit by Grace Zibriskie in Inland Empire are each echoed by the Sarah Palmer beef jerky scene, IMO. Chilling!

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Posted : 01/08/2017 2:37 pm
(@colin_basterfield)
RR Diner Patron
Posted by: Badalamenti Fan
Posted by: Colin Basterfield

I was musing this yesterday and commented somewhere about it.

When Sarah Palmer was having her episode in the store, the tension was palpable. In this scene she left the store muttering, but at any moment, something will happen to yank the rug from under me, leaving me in the woods, alone, at night, disturbed. (I'm a sensitive soul, but striving to embrace wholeness, whatever that entails within me)

An almost perfect example is the Winkies scene in Mulholland Drive and the tension created there from two guys having a meal. I love that scene, btw, the over the shoulder camera and reverse shot work is brilliant.

The build up with Sarah was similar to this and although it didn't happen this time, I think it's fair to assume one of these seemingly innocuous scenes will do a real number on us, and that for me is the magic of this show, and always has been.

At any given moment, no knock, no doorbell... 

OMG. I couldn't agree more. The Winkies' scene in Mulholland Drive and The Visit by Grace Zibriskie in Inland Empire are each echoed by the Sarah Palmer beef jerky scene, IMO. Chilling!

The Grace Z scene in Inland Empire is something, but there is another scene, (at least one :-)) in IE that had me freaked out. It starts off with Laura Dern walking towards the camera up along a windy path...

ReplyQuote
Posted : 01/08/2017 2:41 pm
(@myn0k)
Deputy

I haven't noticed a decrease in pace. The pace has been consistent throughout, with peaks and dips like any good series or story should exhibit. If it were constant, action-paced or full of visual overloads, it would be too much for the viewer. There needs to be a slowdown/contraction followed by an expansion in order to pace things and give the viewer breathing room. Consider what we've uncovered so far in the first 6 episodes. We've got that much left to pace things out as needed. 

The final, completed series will conclude everything in precisely the way Frost and Lynch have prepared it. They wouldn't have created it any other way, because the show is what it is because they created it and meticulously edited it that way. 

I've noticed an increase in impatience though 😀

Just kidding 😉

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Posted : 01/08/2017 2:49 pm
(@badalamenti-fan)
Roadhouse Regular
Posted by: Myn0k

The final, completed series will conclude everything in precisely the way Frost and Lynch have prepared it. They wouldn't have created it any other way, because the show is what it is because they created it and meticulously edited it that way. 

I've noticed an increase in impatience though 😀

Just kidding 😉

No, really tho'.  Some folks are angrier re: Audrey and pacing than the angry driver in Part 11.  Who knew!

ReplyQuote
Posted : 01/08/2017 2:53 pm
(@wow-brad-wow)
Dweller
Posted by: Colin Basterfield
Posted by: Badalamenti Fan
Posted by: Colin Basterfield

I was musing this yesterday and commented somewhere about it.

When Sarah Palmer was having her episode in the store, the tension was palpable. In this scene she left the store muttering, but at any moment, something will happen to yank the rug from under me, leaving me in the woods, alone, at night, disturbed. (I'm a sensitive soul, but striving to embrace wholeness, whatever that entails within me)

An almost perfect example is the Winkies scene in Mulholland Drive and the tension created there from two guys having a meal. I love that scene, btw, the over the shoulder camera and reverse shot work is brilliant.

The build up with Sarah was similar to this and although it didn't happen this time, I think it's fair to assume one of these seemingly innocuous scenes will do a real number on us, and that for me is the magic of this show, and always has been.

At any given moment, no knock, no doorbell... 

OMG. I couldn't agree more. The Winkies' scene in Mulholland Drive and The Visit by Grace Zibriskie in Inland Empire are each echoed by the Sarah Palmer beef jerky scene, IMO. Chilling!

The Grace Z scene in Inland Empire is something, but there is another scene, (at least one :-)) in IE that had me freaked out. It starts off with Laura Dern walking towards the camera up along a windy path...

I doubt there is a scarier  scene than that one.   Still puts me on edge just thinking about it.  

 

In response to people complaining about the show. Frost and Lynch owe you nothing. You can take in their art or not. You don't complain that Jackson Pollock painting doesn't use enough red. You take the art for what it is. 

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Posted : 01/08/2017 3:29 pm
(@yambag021)
RR Diner Patron
Posted by: Badalamenti Fan
Posted by: Yambag021
Posted by: ezekielmoist

I think people should stop watching Twin Peaks looking for facts , just plot's mania.  There's already every other TV show for that! 

Get an emotional point of view or stop watching it. 

 

My emotional point of view is boredom.

There's points where I get excited, and they end it as soon as not starts. I still have faith lynch cleans it up nice and ties everything together, but my fear he will set this up for a season 4, which won't happen, increases week by week.

Why is such formal closure-- the tying up of loose ends-- important or necessary?  

I think viewers have come to expect a certain sort of "clever" dénoument that satisfies because it provides psychological comfort. Our world is morally ambiguous, disorderly, and uncertain, but narrative fiction can instead be utterly rational and "closed."

But I think the metaphor we might be searching for is the inevitability of death/decay and the disorder, ambiguity and uncertainty of human understanding of our condition.

It's important because otherwise this will be a waste of time imo.

I was completely content with how season 2 ended. I thought fwwm was just not good, at all. Did it give some insight into the back story that was nice, yes. Did I think it tried too hard and wasn't good overall? Yea.

But if lynch puts all this effort into all these plotlines he's introduced us to and doesnt wrap it up well, I'll he disappointed.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 01/08/2017 8:52 pm
(@yambag021)
RR Diner Patron

(cont.)

 

And for what it's worth, if lynch is planning a fourth season, unless it's already been inked, I don't see it happening.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 01/08/2017 8:53 pm
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